! (batswing) wrote in wheat_free,
!
batswing
wheat_free

Adventures in wheat.

I have Oatabix!

I emailed Weetabix last night with a sad story of a life with no weetabix, asking for confirmation of the ingredients of their new shiny Oatabix in relation to wheat content.
I got this reply already;


Dear [batswing]

Many thanks for your enquiry.

Oatibix are wheat ingredient free but are made on a line on which Weetabix are made. Of course, the line is cleaned thoroughly between production runs.

The same is true for the plain Oatibix Bitesize, though Bitesize with Sultana & Apple does contain a small amount of wheat fibre.

We trust this is of assistance.

Yours sincerely

Consumer Services Officer
Weetabix Limited




There are now Oatabix in my possesion. I shall now dedicate ten minutes to research to maintain whether this shared production line is going to be a problem. I know it's a sacrafice, but it's one I'm willing to make for the good of Wheatfree-Kind. *heroic sigh*



Oatabix.

These taste like weetabix! *cheers*
They are slightly different in texture, being finer to the taste and less chunky to the chew. They soak up milk more quickly and completely than traditional Weetabix. They are ever so slightly softer (A bit soggier perhaps?), but they hold their shape perfectly if eaten normally. They are not gloopy as I suspected they may be. In fact they're actually very nice and I look forward to breakfast tomorrow!

So far no soreness, I'll keep you updated if anything suspiciously like cross-contamination soreness pops up!

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  • 11 comments
Well, oats themselves are contaminated with wheat, generally from the field to the harvester to the mill. Even if the line is cleaned, that doesn't mean the oats were safe to begin with.
I wouldn't know about oats where you are, but many of the farmers growing oats here don't grow wheat. Contamination from mills is on a low enough level, where it occurs, that many of us feel no ill effects from it.

You know your tolerance and trust levels better than any of us can, but if this, or any, product can improve the range off our diet without tasting like poo, then it's a good thing!
Feeling no ill effects does not mean no ill effects happen - if you have celiac disease even mill cross-contamination can do damage to one's intestines. Just a thought.
Yes, but ths is the wheat-free community. I don't have coeliacs disease, and not everyone else in this community does either. I have a wheat intolerance. It's a good thought, but it's fairly safe to trust every individual in this community to know whether they can tolerate oats, and under what circumstances.

But thanks for the thought.
An FYI - but celiacs avoid oats because of a "wheat intolerance" of sorts, the gluten protein of wheat. It isn't an allergy, but an intolerance as well.

Out of curiosity, what part of wheat causes your intolerance and what are your reactions?
In the US, it's easy to see volunteer wheat and rye in oatfields. The same equipment is used to harvest them, often rented from the local co-op.

I've reacted horribly to (imported) McCann's and to Nannar's wheat-free oat products. I'm not sensitive to (nor allergic to oats), but I am both wheat-allergic and gluten-intolerant. I have both allergic and gluten reactions to most oat products due to cross contamination.
Ouch. :( My sympathies. I'm very lucky, in that case.
Oats are not safe to eat unless they are from one of several companies known to not grow their oats near any gluten-containing crops AND to not process their oats on equipment used to process other grains - This is extremely rare, which is why most gluten-free people avoid oats.

Also, cross-contamination from a shared line is always a problem. If you have Celiac Disease or a serious gluten intolerance you cannot eat food made on a shared line, sadly - Even a little bit of CC is dangerous.

-Another oat-lover
What company makes oats that are ok? I'm dying to make haystack cookies.
I've heard McCann's oats are okay

There's also this:

http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/
Thank you for embarking on this vital experiment! Particularly as it saved me buying some Oatabix and finding it to be vile. I can handle a little gluten occasionally, so the cross contamination isn't really a problem for me.

I guess each person knows how their body reacts, but avoid if unsure.

I miss Weetabix so much....